Peter Ivey II and Peter Ivey III

by Peter "PJ" Ivey III If you’ve been keeping up with the news lately, you have probably heard about George Floyd. Mr Floyd was a regular black man in Minneapolis, up until May 25, when tragic events occurred. He was confronted by two store workers, who claimed that he had used a fake bill to buy a pack of cigarettes. They decided to call the police. Soon, the first police car arrived, with two officers inside. Mr Floyd was handcuffed and, in the process of being taken to a police car, George Floyd fell to the ground. Eventually, another two police officers arrived. Despite telling the officers multiple times that he couldn’t breathe, he was held face down, with pressure being placed on his neck, back, and legs. Once again, Mr Floyd said he couldn’t breathe. While he was pinned down, his mouth started to bleed. Despite at least sixteen calls to say he couldn’t breathe, one police officer continued to knee him in his neck. A little later, he was heard crying for his mother. After minutes, Mr Floyd was unconscious, but the officer’s knees were still on him. Medical assistance arrived and he was taken to a hospital and was pronounced dead. An independent autopsy says Floyd died of "asphyxiation from sustained pressure." The officer with his knee on Mr Floyd’s neck was arrested for murder and manslaughter. My name is Peter “PJ” Ivey III. I am 9-years old and I live in Brooklyn New York. This is my opinion about what happened to Mr Floyd and how it has made me feel as a black boy in America. George Floyd’s death was in no way deserved. I’m shocked that four police officers used such extreme force on a black man for just a fake bill. That wasn't the right way to respond to such a minor crime, and I’m glad all four officers were removed. George Floyd’s death has caused a lot of backlash from the community, and many people thought it was an act of racism. This has caused people to protest in violent ways. Police are supposed to protect people and be kind and they should never hurt or kill people who aren’t armed. To prevent people from getting hurt or scared, I think that there are some basic things that officers can do to be kind to others. Officers should use a soft tone while approaching people and they should never yank people instead of asking them to come. They should always take people seriously when they say that they are hurt or can’t breathe and they should never apply force to someone’s neck. Officers should never aim a gun at anyone unless they absolutely have to. No arrest should end fatally. So far, I have mentioned how most of the community felt, including some of the white community. But there’s a different way that I alone feel. As a young black kid, I’m truly very scared for the future, not only with George Floyd, but also with the protests. If police officers can treat a black man who committed a minor crime with this much force, to result in his death, what’s in store for the rest of the black community, both guilty and innocent? What could happen to me when I grow up? How can I trust the police to protect me? From torching police cars to chanting on top of buildings, the current protesters are my second biggest fear. These protests are very dangerous. And the police are responding with their own weapons, even tear gas. From where I can see, this is going to escalate very violently… This is how I feel about George Floyd’s death. It was very unreasonable and wrong, but so is how the community is responding. Violence is never the answer. I don’t want anything like this to happen again. Together, in a peaceful way, we can bring #JusticeForGeorgeFloyd.

Botham Jean's mother, Allison Jean, center, escorted by civil rights attorney Lee Merritt, right,, is hugged by family members outside the courtroom after fired Dallas police officer Amber Guyger was found guilty of murder, Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019, in Dallas. (Tom Fox/The Dallas Morning News via AP, Pool)

“Every time another black man, another black person is killed in America it brings me right back to September 6 (2018) and it tears me apart.” Allison Jean, on the killing of George Floyd. In 2018 her son, 26-year-old Accountant Botham Jean was fatally shot by an off-duty Dallas police officer while in his apartment. The grieving mother said the passage of time has done little to assuage her feelings of loss and bewilderment. She said nothing could fill the void left since her son’s untimely death. [related node_id='bcc52fbc-309a-4447-97da-89728c3a45f4'] She told Loop: “What happened with George Floyd in the United States, especially with the brutality of the police officer who was on his neck, highlights to me what my son suffered at the hands of Amber Guyger. Because Amber Guyger was very hasty in just shooting him without asking any questions, without finding out whether she was in the wrong apartment or not, so I think it is a cultural issue as it relates to police officers in the United States, they are very hasty when they come into confrontation with black people. So yes, it has caused what happened to Botham to resurface. I see it as very much related to what happened to Botham and what has happened to countless other black men and women in America.” George Floyd diedon May 25 after he was arrested outside a shop in Minneapolis. Footage of the arrest shows a white police officer kneeling on his neck while he was handcuffed and pinned to the floor. His death has since sparked widespread unrest throughout the United States. Allison Jean said Floyd’s murder at the hands of Minneapolis police underscores the need for a shift in the culture of police officers in the United States. Still struggling to come to terms with her son's murder, she said the systemic racism, police brutality and attacks against people of colour must be addressed. “Just two weeks earlier we were fighting the cause of Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor who were killed in unfortunate circumstances. In the case of Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia by white persons who believed that he did not deserve to be jogging in a particular neighbourhood. And in Breonna Taylor’s case, by police who were called in, similar to the incident of Atatiana Jefferson in Forth Worth, Texas. So the protests that we see around the United States I believe they are warranted so that the voices of frustrated people can be heard. They need to march, they need to protest, and they need to demonstrate their disgust for the US system. Following the death of my son Botham Jean, there were protests as well but apparently, these protests went on deaf ears so we’re seeing a stronger force coming out in the United States over George Floyd’s strangulation by a wicked police officer.” She said she lives with the pain of her son’s death every day and that pain is magnified every time a person of colour is brutalised or killed at the hands of police. During an interview with Loop she said she's only been able to go on because of her unwavering faith in God and the constant support of family and friends who make her cross that much easier to bear. “I thank God that I trust in him! I believe in God, I continue to pray, I continue to just depend on him and with the help of friends and family I have been able to manage what is going on. However, every time another black man, another black person is killed in America it brings me right back to September 6 (2018) it tears me apart. This weekend was particularly difficult when I saw on CNN that there was a documentary of some of the young men and women who were killed at the hands of police and Botham was featured in that documentary. So it brings the pain back, I don’t know whether I will ever be the same again having lost my son.” While standing in support of protesters in the US, Jean also called for what she described as much-needed improvements to the judicial system in her native St Lucia. Drawing reference to two allegedly police-involved shootings, she said better must be done. “I am still disturbed that we have cases like Kimberly Williams de Leon and that of Arnold Joseph and we have not received any results of any investigations, any outcome of the investigation absolutely no accountability for their deaths. This is unacceptable so while as St Lucians we are watching the United States and in my case, I support what is happening in the United States I have to ask what are we doing in St Lucia to show our dissatisfaction with the justice system over what is happening to our own people.” On October 29, 2018, Kimberly was shot dead at her Morne Fortune home. Her husband who is a member of the St Lucia police force was considered a person of interest but was subsequently cleared. No arrests have been made. Arnold Joseph was killed after police opened fire on a vehicle he was in. According to reports the officers were in pursuit of the vehicle when it crashed. They opened fire claiming they were fired at first. The 17-year-old was the only fatality. Allison Jean said: “What are we doing about it? I believe the US and what is happening should be used as a lesson for us in St Lucia, for officials in St Lucia, for police, for the judicial system, the government and for every St Lucian to see that when people are frustrated, disgusted and unsatisfied they can change the way in which they demand accountability. So I’m calling on everyone to come out and make St Lucia a better place.” She believes that changes are desperately needed within the police force in St Lucia and in the United States.


Digicel has entered into a network sharing joint venture with Iliad, which allows the French operator to access Digicel’s Radio Access Network capabilities in the French West Indies. The communication leader had announced that it had entered into ajoint venture agreement during its Q3 FY20 earnings call on 25 February 2020. On Tuesday, it provided further details on this agreement. The agreement sees Digicel monetising its significant network assets across five countries in the French West Indies region – Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guiana, StMartin and StBarth - while Iliad benefits from a solution to launch its mobile services. The two companies will share future operational investments with an ambition of building one of the most extensive networks in the French West Indies by increasing the number of sites and providing further fibre connectivity for improved coverage and speed. The agreement is subject to the required regulatory approvals. Commenting on the agreement, Digicel Group CEO, Jean-Yves Charlier, said; “As we continue our journey towards becoming a digital operator, we recognise that sharing infrastructure in a multi-operator marketplace provides the foundation to offer better network services to our customers, whilst reducing the cost structure. “A joint venture of this nature is a first for Digicel and allows us to accelerate our digital ambitions," he continued. "We are delighted to be partnering with a world-class telecom operator in Iliad and to be sharing a common vision of jointly building one of the most extensive networks across the French West Indies.”

Cayman has reached another COVID-19 milestone today as more businesses reopen. On June 22, Cayman is expected to move to level 2 suppression of COVID-19. This phase will see the allowance of external guardians and helpers in the home. More high touch businesses will open. Staycations will be allowed. But before wemoveto this phase, there will be a two-phased opening up of economic activity. As of today, June 1, all construction and related businesses will be allowed to operate. All retail and real estate businesses will be allowed to operate. Masks and social distancing will be required. As of June 7, groups of up to 6 people at a table will be allowed to dine at restaurants and bars that have outdoor/ patio seating as a part of the premises. Social distancing will be required for those who are not a part of the same household. Tables must be at least 8 feet apart. Indoor seating or serving will not be allowed. This will be allowed until 9 pm. Restaurant deliveries will be allowed until 11 pm. Persons employed by businesses other than restaurants will be able to deliver until 11 pm. Businesses not specified above will continue to stay closed with employees working remotely.


Figuratively Speaking,theart show that consists of artwork brought to life on plastic mannequin canvases, has relocated from its home at Awardart Gallery at ArtNest to Calypso Grill in West Bay. And what better time to exhibit thehand-painted mannequins than for the grand opening of Calypso Grill's "To Go" and "In Dining." Calypso Grill will openits "To go" and"In Dining" on Thursday, June 4, featuring its new "Missed You" menu with beloved local favourites such as lobster bisque, marinated conch, crabcakes and escoveitch. Calypso Grill will, of course, be rearranging its tables to accommodate social distancing. Calypso Grill's 'Missed You' menu "To Go" days will be Thursday - Saturday from 1 pm - 8.30 pm and Sundays from 12 pm - 6.30 pm. The phones will be open for orders from 11 am on Thursday - Saturday and from 10 am on Sundays. Delivery areas will include from Snug Harbour to 7 Mile and Up to West Bay. "We have also been preparing 'a redo'of Calypso Grill to comply with requirements that will be in place when restaurants are fully back on stream," said owner, Teresa Grimes. "These changes are to ease our guests' minds and make them comfortable with 'Dining In'again and to make us comfortable with having guests again. Something we ALL are looking forward to."

Peter Ivey II and Peter Ivey III

by Peter "PJ" Ivey III If you’ve been keeping up with the news lately, you have probably heard about George Floyd. Mr Floyd was a regular black man in Minneapolis, up until May 25, when tragic events occurred. He was confronted by two store workers, who claimed that he had used a fake bill to buy a pack of cigarettes. They decided to call the police. Soon, the first police car arrived, with two officers inside. Mr Floyd was handcuffed and, in the process of being taken to a police car, George Floyd fell to the ground. Eventually, another two police officers arrived. Despite telling the officers multiple times that he couldn’t breathe, he was held face down, with pressure being placed on his neck, back, and legs. Once again, Mr Floyd said he couldn’t breathe. While he was pinned down, his mouth started to bleed. Despite at least sixteen calls to say he couldn’t breathe, one police officer continued to knee him in his neck. A little later, he was heard crying for his mother. After minutes, Mr Floyd was unconscious, but the officer’s knees were still on him. Medical assistance arrived and he was taken to a hospital and was pronounced dead. An independent autopsy says Floyd died of "asphyxiation from sustained pressure." The officer with his knee on Mr Floyd’s neck was arrested for murder and manslaughter. My name is Peter “PJ” Ivey III. I am 9-years old and I live in Brooklyn New York. This is my opinion about what happened to Mr Floyd and how it has made me feel as a black boy in America. George Floyd’s death was in no way deserved. I’m shocked that four police officers used such extreme force on a black man for just a fake bill. That wasn't the right way to respond to such a minor crime, and I’m glad all four officers were removed. George Floyd’s death has caused a lot of backlash from the community, and many people thought it was an act of racism. This has caused people to protest in violent ways. Police are supposed to protect people and be kind and they should never hurt or kill people who aren’t armed. To prevent people from getting hurt or scared, I think that there are some basic things that officers can do to be kind to others. Officers should use a soft tone while approaching people and they should never yank people instead of asking them to come. They should always take people seriously when they say that they are hurt or can’t breathe and they should never apply force to someone’s neck. Officers should never aim a gun at anyone unless they absolutely have to. No arrest should end fatally. So far, I have mentioned how most of the community felt, including some of the white community. But there’s a different way that I alone feel. As a young black kid, I’m truly very scared for the future, not only with George Floyd, but also with the protests. If police officers can treat a black man who committed a minor crime with this much force, to result in his death, what’s in store for the rest of the black community, both guilty and innocent? What could happen to me when I grow up? How can I trust the police to protect me? From torching police cars to chanting on top of buildings, the current protesters are my second biggest fear. These protests are very dangerous. And the police are responding with their own weapons, even tear gas. From where I can see, this is going to escalate very violently… This is how I feel about George Floyd’s death. It was very unreasonable and wrong, but so is how the community is responding. Violence is never the answer. I don’t want anything like this to happen again. Together, in a peaceful way, we can bring #JusticeForGeorgeFloyd.