Sunday 20 September, 2020

2 tropical storms, 2 hurricanes swirling around the Atlantic

Photo: Seven systems including two hurricanes and two tropical storms are being monitored by weather agencies as of September 14, 2020. Photo courtesy the US National Hurricane Center.

Photo: Seven systems including two hurricanes and two tropical storms are being monitored by weather agencies as of September 14, 2020. Photo courtesy the US National Hurricane Center.

The Atlantic hurricane season is swirling with weather systems, including two hurricanes and two tropical storms. 

The Trinidad and Tobago Meteorological Service said in a statement Monday that it is monitoring tropical storms Vicky and Teddy however at this time neither storm poses any direct threat to Trinidad and Tobago. 

'The Trinidad and Tobago Meteorological Service (TTMS) has been closely monitoring Tropical Storm Teddy (and newly developed Tropical Storm Vicky in the Atlantic). Current analyses indicate that none of these systems pose any direct threat to Trinidad and Tobago.'

The Met Office said Tropical Storm Teddy is located at approximately 12.8N 42.8W (2015 km east of the Lesser Antilles), moving westward near 22 km/hr.

The Met Office said Tropical Storm Teddy is not expected to make landfall on the Eastern Caribbean, but it is expected to rapidly intensify into a powerful hurricane within the next few days and generate large swells which are expected to reach the Lesser Antilles as well as the north-eastern coast of south America by midweek.

The Met Office said as of Monday midday, Tropical Storm Vicky was located at approximately 18.7N 28.5W (565 km west-northwest of the Cape Verde Islands), moving north-westward near 9km/hr.

'Vicky is a minimal Tropical Storm which is expected to weaken by Tuesday night. At this time, Tropical Storm Vicky poses NO threat to the Eastern Caribbean.'

The Met Office said it will continue to closely monitor these systems and will issue an update only if the situation warrants.

NHC monitoring Hurricanes Sally and Paulette

Meanwhile, two hurricanes, Paulette and Sally, are also in motion.

The US National Hurricane Center said as of Monday morning, Sally was located near latitude 28.7 North, longitude 87.0 West. Sally is moving toward the west-northwest near 7 mph (11 km/h).

This general motion is expected to continue today, followed by a decrease in forward speed and a turn toward the northwest tonight and a northward turn sometime on Tuesday. 

On the forecast track, the center of Sally will move over the north-central Gulf of Mexico today, approach southeastern Louisiana tonight, and make landfall in the hurricane warning area on Tuesday or Tuesday night.

Afterward, Sally is expected to move slowly north-northeastward near the northern Gulf Coast through Wednesday.

Data from NOAA and Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft indicate that Sally has rapidly strengthened. The maximum sustained winds are near 90 mph (150 km/h) with higher gusts.  Additional strengthening is forecast during the next day or so.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles (35 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125 miles (205 km).

The latest minimum central pressure estimated from reconnaissance aircraft data is 986 mb (29.12 inches).

 

Hurricane Paulette

The NHC said the center of Hurricane Paulette was located near latitude 33.2 North, longitude 64.8 West after passing over Bermuda on Monday morning. 

Paulette is moving toward the north near 14 mph (22 km/h), and this general motion should continue into this afternoon. 

A turn toward the northeast is expected later tonight followed by a turn toward the east-northeast and an increase in forward speed Tuesday night through Friday morning.

Maximum sustained winds are near 100 mph (155 km/h) with higher gusts.  Additional strengthening through Tuesday night is likely  as Paulette acclerates northeastward to east-northeastward. Gradual weakening is forecast to begin on Wednesday.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 45 miles (75 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 175 miles (280 km).  A weather station in Wreck Road, Bermuda recently reported a sustained wind of 80 mph (130 km/h) and a gust to 107 mph (170 km/h).

The estimated minimum central pressure is 970 mb (28.65 inches). 

Get the latest local and international news straight to your mobile phone for free: