Brigadier Jerry

The Waterbury Police in Connecticut have confirmed that dancehall icon Brigadier Jerry has been charged with first-degree robbery, first-degree reckless endangerment, illegal discharge of a firearm, carrying a pistol without a permit, illegal transfer of a pistol and altering a serial number on a firearm. The charges stem from a shooting incident over three days ago. The court also confirmed that the artiste, whose real name is Robert Russell, is being heldon a US$250,000bond. "Russell is currently detained and will return to the Waterbury Superior court, 400 Grand Street on November 27th," a clerk court told Loop News reporter Claude Mills. Efforts to speak to the artiste's wife or the Victim's Advocate at the Waterbury Superior Court were futile. According to Waterbury police blotters, the artiste suspected that someone had stolen his wallet earlier during a card game. He allegedly left Bertie’s West Indian and American restaurant on North Main Street and returned with a gun, the police said. The next moments would play out like a scene of macho street theatre befitting a movie western.The card game reportedly went south when the 62 year-old entertainer allegedly fired off shot into a wall, sending card players scurrying for cover. Like a real cowboy, Brigadier then grabbed the cash from the table, strolled out, got into a black BMW car, registered to him and drove away from the scene. No one was injured in the gunfire, according to police. Officers were called to the Caribbean eatery at about 11.30 pm, after the reported gunfire and reported that the restaurant was closed, but found card players inside. The Waterbury officers found the black BMW, as well as Russell, at 272 Hill Street a short time later. They also found a loaded pistol on the south side of the building during their search. Robert Russell, popularly known as ‘Brigadier Jerry,’ ‘The General’ and ‘Briggy’ was born in Papine area, eastern Kingston in 1957. He is known for his work with Daddy U-Roy’s King Stur-Gav Hi-Fi sound system that based in Olympic Garden, Waterhouse area in Kingston alongside Josey Wales, Charlie Chaplain and Daddy Roy. Jerry first started as a stand-up comedian then switched to deejaying for a local dancehall sound systems. In 1978, he became a member of the Twelve Tribes of Israel Rastafarian organization and spread their message on the Jah Love Muzik sound system. Over his decades long career he had performed all over the world and now resides in the United States. He is the brother of another dancehall icon, Sister Nancy.

Photos via Raoul De Souza/Facebook

A story of a man who rescued a dog from a raging fire in Queenstown, Guyana, has gone viral online. Raoul Anthony De Souza shared photos to Facebook showing a house which appeared to be engulfed in flames, outlining the gate where he heard a dog was trapped and crying in Queenstown. De Souza said he was heading to gym on Tuesday when he encountered the fire and the terrified dog which appeared to be burning. “So yesterday I was on my way to gym when I saw a house on fire in Queenstown, I could hear the loud cry of a dog trapped on the back step. “The gate was locked, she was about to be burned alive,” he said. (Photos via Raoul De Souza/Facebook) De Souza decided to take action to rescue the dog from an agonising death. “I could not stand and watch that happen…I did the unthinkable by going up the back step to rescue the dog as I get to the dog, she was badly burned as I hold her, her skin began to (come) loose in my hands,” he said. De Souza said he held onto the dog which, out of pain and fear, bit him on his arm. “With fear in her she bit me but I wasn't going to give up until she was brought to safety...thank God for the courage to do it,” he said. (Photos via Raoul De Souza/Facebook) He shared photos showing the dog with severe burns but in a subsequent update on Wednesday, De Souza said the dog was on the mend. (Photos via Raoul De Souza/Facebook) The post had almost 2,000 likes and over 700 shares as many commended him for his heroic efforts. William Bill Cato Raul: “I am heartbroken reading about this tragic spate of events, but glad that you took your life into your hands to rescue this poor animal from certain death, in Guyana. Your actions are commendable. Man oh man, I am in tears! Hopefully no one perished in that home. Thank you very much for sharing this story.” Michelle Layne: “Thank god you and the dog are ok kudos for your courage and bravery Gods blessings to you.” Indra Singh: “I am so touched by your act of kindness! God bless you! It will go a long way! It takes courage to do what you have done!” Anne Harrison: “Raul you are a true hero thank you for saving the poor baby. She must be in such pain but I’m glad she will recover. May God bless and reward you and yours a thousand fold.” Would you have done what he did? Share your comments below.


File-This Aug. 15, 2019, file photo shows dozens of grounded Boeing 737 MAX airplanes crowd a parking area adjacent to Boeing Field in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

Boeing is settling a few more of the roughly 150 lawsuits filed by families of passengers killed in two crashes of the 737 Max jet. A Seattle law firm said Friday it settled four of the 46 cases it’s handling for families of passengers who were onboard a Lion Air Max that crashed off the coast of Indonesia in October 2018. On Thursday, a federal judge in Chicago approved settlements of nine other cases involving the same crash. A Boeing spokesman said the company has settled “dozens” of claims. Terms of the settlements were kept confidential at Boeing’s insistence, according to lawyers. Chicago-based Boeing has spent about a year making changes to flight software that played a role in the crashes. The company expects Federal Aviation Administration approval in January for a new pilot-training program around the changes, which would let USairlines resume using the plane early next year. The FAA, however, has not laid out a timetable for approving Boeing’s changes, and the agency’s chief vowed again Friday that the plane won’t fly until it’s safe. “I know there is a lot of pressure to return this aircraft to service quickly,” FAA Administrator Stephen Dickson said Friday in a video for agency employees, “but I want you to know, and I want you to take the time you need and focus solely on safety.” According to federal court records, more than 50 lawsuits were filed against Boeing by families of passengers on the Lion Air Max that crashed October29, 2018, and about 100 lawsuits were filed relating to the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Max on March 10. Boeing Co. is working with a mediator, “and we are pleased to have resolved dozens of claims on terms that we believe fairly compensate the victims’ families,” Boeing spokesman Peter Pedraza said in a statement. “We remain committed to this mediation process.” Boeing didn’t disclose the amount of the settlements, but Pedraza said Boeing has paid more than $7 million in separate aid to the families since setting up a special fund two months ago. The company’s legal strategy, however, has come under fire by lawmakers and lawyers for the passengers’ families. Lawyers for Boeing have said in several court filings that they could seek to move the lawsuits to courts in Indonesia, on grounds that it would be more convenient — most of the victims were Indonesians. Legal experts say judgments in Indonesian courts would likely be smaller. Boeing lawyers have not yet asked the judge to move the cases, but the mere threat of a motion could be helping the company negotiate with victims’ families. Alexandra Wisner, a Chicago-area aviation lawyer whose settlements were approved by a federal judge this week, said lawyers like her must consider Boeing’s potential defenses — including the ability to send the cases overseas — when negotiating for their clients. She said, however, that it would be overly simple to suggest that Boeing’s strategy resulted in lower settlements for her clients. Seattle aviation lawyer Mark Lindquist, whose firm announced four new settlements and has 42 other cases pending against Boeing, said there are strong reasons for keeping the cases in the US. “The UShas a great interest in the safety of aircraft manufactured in the United States, most of the evidence of Boeing’s wrongdoing is here in the US, and only a United States court can hold Boeing accountable,” he said. Last month, Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg told a congressional committee he wasn’t aware of the company’s legal strategy. That drew a skeptical response by Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., chairman of the House Transportation Committee. “You’re looking at hundreds of millions, billions of dollars of claims ... and you don’t know that that’s happening?” DeFazio said. “Congressman, my focus has been on safety,” Muilenburg replied. On Friday, DeFazio said he sent several follow-up questions to Muilenburg, including whether Boeing intends to move the Lion Air lawsuits to Indonesia. The settlements that have been publicly announced or revealed in court filings all involve families of passengers on the first Max crash. The families agreed to take part in mediation with Boeing. Lawyers for families of passengers in the second crash, in Ethiopia, have opted instead to seek documents from Boeing. Victims in that crash represented many more nationalities. Wisner, who has clients related to both incidents, said Boeing is open to more second-guessing about the second crash. “What did they know, what did they learn from the first crash, and why didn’t they take any action” to ground the plane immediately? she said.

Cayman Code Academy (CCA)welcomed 25 individuals who took part in introductory code courses taught by Amanda Iverson, a lead instructor of Code Fellows based in Seattle, Washington. The academy sets out to cultivate passionate skilled coders and deliver internationally-recognised curriculum that engages directly with the Cayman Islands’ tech community. The initiative, which was recently developed by Cayman Enterprise City (CEC), the University College of the Cayman Islands (UCCI) and Code Fellows, is helping to ensure that Cayman’s flourishing digital economy and leading-edge companies have access to the talent they need. One of the first programming partnerships established in the greater Caribbean, 101 and 102 courses were offered to individuals with no prior experience to provide a sound introduction and access to industry-leading expertise. “This new network expands our knowledge and acts as an important step towards connecting with tech professionals and industry experts,” explained CCA participant Anna Marie Propper. “As a complete novice, I found the high level of support and student to teacher/TA ratio extremely helpful." The academy sets out to cultivate passionate skilled coders and deliver internationally-recognised curriculum that engages directly with the Cayman Islands’ tech community. The initiative is helping to ensure that Cayman’s flourishing digital economy and leading-edge companies have access to the talent they need. Registration is now open for Code 101: Explore Software Development, which takes place Saturday, November 30. For more information and to register, visit Cayman Code Academy or email info@caymancodeacademy.com.


It's the weekend again and that means several events are taking place on our beautiful islands. And just so you don't get caught out, here are a few road closures andtraffic advisories you should know about. TheLinford Pierson Highwaywill be closedbetween the Kings Roundabout and the roundabout immediately west(vicinity of Alamo Drive) from6 amto 8 am on Sunday (November 17). This is to facilitate theCayman Islands Conference of Seventh Day Adventists'30th Anniversary International 10K Run/Walk,beginning at 6 am. The event will begin on Walkers Road near Websters Estates and participants will travel north to South Sound Road, then east along South Sound Road to Old Crewe Road, north to the Linford Pierson Highway, and west to Smith Road, finishing at the Cayman Islands Conference Office on Walkers Road. The event is expected to be completed by 8 am. Motorists are advised to exercise caution when travelling along the route of the event on Sunday morning. Also on Sunday, Cayman Water will be hosting their annual Pete Ribbins Memorial Bike Ride and Run, which begins at 6.30 am. The event starts and ends at the Cayman Water Plant off the Esterley Tibbets Highway and participants will travel south along the Esterley Tibbets Highway to the Butterfield Roundabout, turn west onto Godfrey Nixon Way, north onto Eastern Avenue, then travel to the Seven Mile Beach Roundabout via West Bay Road, and north into West Bay via the Esterley Tibbetts Highway and West Bay Road. The participants will then travel through West Bay, via North West Point Road, Water Course Road, Hell Road, Mount Pleasant Road, Fountain Road, Finch Drive, Birch Tree Hill Road, Conch Point Road and Batabano Road, then south onto the Esterley Tibbetts Highway to Lime Tree Bay Avenue. They will then turn around and travel north on Esterley Tibbetts up to Batabano Road, and return to the Esterley Tibbetts Highway via Willie Farrington Drive, continuing south to the Cayman Water Plant. The event is expected to be completed by 8.30 am. Motorists traveling in these areas on Sunday morning are advised to exercise caution.

Cayman Code Academy (CCA)welcomed 25 individuals who took part in introductory code courses taught by Amanda Iverson, a lead instructor of Code Fellows based in Seattle, Washington. The academy sets out to cultivate passionate skilled coders and deliver internationally-recognised curriculum that engages directly with the Cayman Islands’ tech community. The initiative, which was recently developed by Cayman Enterprise City (CEC), the University College of the Cayman Islands (UCCI) and Code Fellows, is helping to ensure that Cayman’s flourishing digital economy and leading-edge companies have access to the talent they need. One of the first programming partnerships established in the greater Caribbean, 101 and 102 courses were offered to individuals with no prior experience to provide a sound introduction and access to industry-leading expertise. “This new network expands our knowledge and acts as an important step towards connecting with tech professionals and industry experts,” explained CCA participant Anna Marie Propper. “As a complete novice, I found the high level of support and student to teacher/TA ratio extremely helpful." The academy sets out to cultivate passionate skilled coders and deliver internationally-recognised curriculum that engages directly with the Cayman Islands’ tech community. The initiative is helping to ensure that Cayman’s flourishing digital economy and leading-edge companies have access to the talent they need. Registration is now open for Code 101: Explore Software Development, which takes place Saturday, November 30. For more information and to register, visit Cayman Code Academy or email info@caymancodeacademy.com.