The Barbados Meteorological Services has issued a further update on Tropical Storm Jerry. As of 5 pm on September 19, Jerry has strengthened to theeast of the Leeward Islands. Tropical Storm ...


Tensions are flaring in the Persian Gulf after President Donald Trump said the US is "locked and loaded" to respond to a weekend drone assault on Saudi Arabia's energy infrastructure that his aides blamed on Iran. The attack, which halved the kingdom's oil production and sent crude prices spiking, led Trump to authorize the release of US strategic reserves should they be necessary to stabilize markets. Trump said the US had reason to believe it knew who was behind the attack his secretary of state had blamed on Iran the previous day and said his government was waiting to consult with the Saudis as to who they believe was behind the attack and "under what terms we would proceed!" The tweets Sunday followed a National Security Council meeting at the White House and hours after US officials offered what they said was proof that the attack was inconsistent with claims of responsibility by Yemen's Iran-backed Houthi rebels and instead pointed the finger directly at Tehran. A US official said all options, including a military response, were on the table, but added that no decisions had been made. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the internal deliberations. Iran called the US claims "maximum lies" and threatened American forces in the region. The attack dimmed hopes for potential nuclear talks between Trump and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani at the UN General Assembly this week. The US government produced satellite photos showing what officials said were at least 19 points of impact at two Saudi energy facilities, including damage at the heart of the kingdom's crucial oil processing plant at Abqaiq. Officials said the photos show impacts consistent with the attack coming from the direction of Iran or Iraq, rather than from Yemen to the south. Iraq denied that its territory was used for an attack on the kingdom. US officials said a strike from there would be a violation of Iraq's sovereignty. The US officials said additional devices, which apparently didn't reach their targets, were recovered northwest of the facilities and are being jointly analyzed by Saudi and American intelligence. The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence matters, did not address whether the drone could have been fired from Yemen, then taken a round-about path, but did not explicitly rule it out. The attacks and recriminations are increasing already heightened fears of an escalation in the region, after a prominent US senator suggested striking Iranian oil refineries in response to the assault, and Iran warned of the potential of more violence. "Because of the tension and sensitive situation, our region is like a powder keg," said Iranian Brig. Gen. Amir Ali Hajizadeh. "When these contacts come too close, when forces come into contact with one another, it is possible a conflict happens because of a misunderstanding." Actions on any side could break into the open a twilight war that's been raging just below the surface of the wider Persian Gulf in recent months. Already, there have been mysterious attacks on oil tankers that America blames on Tehran, at least one suspected Israeli strike on Shiite forces in Iraq, and Iran shooting down a US military surveillance drone. The attack Saturday on Saudi Arabia's Abqaiq plant and its Khurais oil field led to the interruption of an estimated 5.7 million barrels of the kingdom's crude oil production per day, equivalent to more than 5% of the world's daily supply. It remains unclear how King Salman and his assertive son, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, will respond to an attack targeting the heart of the Saudi oil industry. Crude oil futures shot up 9.5% to $60 as trading opened Sunday evening in New York, a dramatic increase. Saudi Arabia has promised to fill in the cut in production with its reserves, but has not said how long it will take to repair the damage. The Wall Street Journal cited Saudi officials as saying a third of output would be restored on Monday, but a return to full production may take weeks. In Washington, Trump said he had approved the release of US strategic petroleum reserves "if needed" to stabilize energy markets. The president said the final amount of the release, if any, would be "sufficient to keep the markets well-supplied." He later credited himself for expanding US energy exports in a Monday morning tweet, writing: "We don't need Middle Eastern Oil & Gas, & in fact have very few tankers there, but will help our Allies!" Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi dismissed the US allegation of responsibility as "blind and futile comments." "The Americans adopted the 'maximum pressure' policy against Iran, which, due to its failure, is leaning toward 'maximum lies,'" Mousavi said in a statement. Houthi leader Muhammad al-Bukhaiti reiterated his group's claim of responsibility, telling The Associated Press it exploited "vulnerabilities" in Saudi air defenses to strike the targets. He did not elaborate. Iran, meanwhile, kept up its own threats. Hajizadeh, the brigadier general who leads the country's aerospace program, said in an interview published across Iranian media Sunday that Revolutionary Guard forces were ready for a counterattack if America responded, naming the Al-Udeid Air Base in Qatar and Al-Dhafra Air Base near Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates as immediate targets, as well as US Navy ships in the Persian Gulf and the Arabian Sea. "Wherever they are, it only takes one spark and we hit their vessels, their air bases, their troops," he said in a video published online with English subtitles. Trump insisted that unspecified conditions must be met before he would sit down with the Iranian leader, apparently rejecting the comments of two top advisers. "The Fake News is saying that I am willing to meet with Iran, 'No Conditions.' That is an incorrect statement (as usual!)." In fact, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said last week that "the president has said that he is prepared to meet with no conditions." And Pompeo had told reporters days earlier that "the President has made clear he is happy to take a meeting with no preconditions." Iran has said it was unwilling to meet with Trump while crushing sanctions the American leader imposed on Tehran after unilaterally withdrawing from the 2015 nuclear accord over a year ago remain in place.

On the ground, climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach — not to mention the forests, plants and animals. A new United Nations scientific report examines how global warming and land interact in a vicious cycle. Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the land, while the way people use the land is making global warming worse. Thursday’s science-laden report says the combination is already making food more expensive, scarcer and even less nutritious. “The cycle is accelerating,” said NASA climate scientist Cynthia Rosenzweig, a report co-author. “The threat of climate change affecting people’s food on their dinner table is increasing.” But if people change the way they eat, grow food and manage forests, it could help save the planet from a far warmer future, scientists said Earth’s landmasses, which are only 30% of the globe, are warming twice as fast as the planet as a whole. While heat-trapping gases are causing problems in the atmosphere, the land has been less talked about as part of climate change. A special report, written by more than 100 scientists and unanimously approved by diplomats from nations around the world at a meeting in Geneva, proposed possible fixes and made more dire warnings. “The way we use land is both part of the problem and also part of the solution,” said Valerie Masson-Delmotte, a French climate scientist who co-chairs one of the panel’s working groups. “Sustainable land management can help secure a future that is comfortable.” Scientists in Thursday’s press conference emphasized both the seriousness of the problem and the need to make societal changes soon. “We don’t want a message of despair,” said science panel official Jim Skea, a professor at Imperial College London. “We want to get across the message that every action makes a difference” The report said climate change already has worsened land degradation, caused deserts to grow, permafrost to thaw and made forests more vulnerable to drought, fire, pests and disease. That’s happened even as much of the globe has gotten greener because of extra carbon dioxide in the air. Climate change has also added to other forces that have reduced the number of species on Earth. “Climate change is really slamming the land,” said World Resources Institute researcher Kelly Levin, who wasn’t part of the study but praised it. And the future could be worse. “The stability of food supply is projected to decrease as the magnitude and frequency of extreme weather events that disrupt food chains increases,” the report said. In the worst-case scenario, food security problems change from moderate to high risk with just a few more tenths of a degree of warming from now. They go from high to “very high” risk with just another 1.8 degrees (1 degree Celsius) of warming from now. Scientists had long thought one of the few benefits of higher levels of carbon dioxide, the major heat-trapping gas, was that it made plants grow more and the world greener, Rosenzweig said. But numerous studies show that the high levels of carbon dioxide reduce protein and nutrients in many crops. For example, high levels of carbon in the air in experiments show wheat has 6 to 13% less protein, 4 to 7% less zinc and 5 to 8% less iron, she said. But better farming practices — such as no-till agricultural and better targeted fertilizer application — have the potential to fight global warming too, reducing carbon pollution up to 18% of current emissions levels by 2050, the report said. If people change their diets, reducing red meat and increasing plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables and seeds, the world can save as much as another 15% of current emissions by mid-century. It would also make people more healthy, Rosenzweig said. The science panel said they aren’t telling people what to eat because that’s a personal choice. Still, Hans-Otto Portner, a panel leader from Germany who said he lost weight and felt better after reducing his meat consumption, told a reporter that if she ate less ribs and more vegetables “that’s a good decision and you will help the planet reduce greenhouse gas emissions.” Reducing food waste can fight climate change even more. The report said that between 2010 and 2016 global food waste accounted for 8 to 10% of heat-trapping emissions. “Currently 25-30% of total food produced is lost or wasted,” the report said. Fixing that would free up millions of square miles of land. With just another 0.9 degrees of warming (0.5 degrees Celsius), which could happen in the next 10 to 30 years, the risk of unstable food supplies, wildfire damage, thawing permafrost and water shortages in dry areas “are projected to be high,” the report said. At another 1.8 degrees of warming from now (1 degree Celsius), which could happen in about 50 years, it said those risks “are projected to be very high.” Most scenarios predict the world’s tropical regions will have “unprecedented climatic conditions by the mid to late 20th century,” the report noted. Agriculture and forestry together account for about 23% of the heat-trapping gases that are warming the Earth, slightly less than from cars, trucks, boats and planes. Add in transporting food, energy costs, packaging and that grows to 37%, the report said. But the land is also a great carbon “sink,” which sucks heat-trapping gases out of the air. From about 2007 to 2016, agriculture and forestry every year put 5.7 billion tons (5.2 billion metric tons) of carbon dioxide into the air, but pulled 12.3 billion tons (11.2 billion metric tons) of it out. “This additional gift from nature is limited. It’s not going to continue forever,” said study co-author Luis Verchot , a scientist at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture in Colombia. “If we continue to degrade ecosystems, if we continue to convert natural ecosystems, we continue to deforest and we continued to destroy our soils, we’re going to lose this natural subsidy.” Overall land emissions are increasing, especially because of cutting down forests in the Amazon in places such as Brazil, Colombia and Peru, Verchot said. Recent forest management changes in Brazil “contradicts all the messages that are coming out of the report,” Portner said. Stanford University environmental sciences chief Chris Field, who wasn’t part of the report, said the bottom line is “we ought to recognize that we have profound limits on the amount of land available and we have to be careful about how we utilize it.”


Dr. Delroy Jefferson, Medical Director of the Cayman Islands Health Services Authority (HSA), has been named a Distinguished Humanitarian by the Global Listening Centre. The Global Listening Centre (GLC) is an international non-profit organisation that defines listening as effective intercultural and interpersonal relations by being attentive and respectful of all persons. As a member of the GLC, Dr. Jefferson has been recognized for his contributions in both his personal and professional environments. Dr Jefferson is just one of three individuals globally to receive this 2019 Distinguished Humanitarian Award. For the past fifteen years, Dr. Jefferson has dedicated his annual leave to humanitarian efforts in countries such as Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica and Egypt. On these self-funded trips, he provides medical aid to persons with socioeconomic challenges free of charge. In keeping with his mandate to be an effective global listener, he engages in cultural exchange with these persons, offering insight to his culture while absorbing theirs in return. In his role as a physician, providing free care to less fortunate persons has been a longstanding passion of Dr. Jefferson. In addition to providing healthcare assistance, Dr. Jefferson has also funded academic scholarships for students in Africa and the Caribbean. “I look forward to my annual humanitarian missions as a time of renewal”, says Dr. Jefferson. “Interacting with those with lesser voices and empowering through education, financial aid or healthcare gives me extraordinary fulfilment. Knowing that I have aided those persons gives me the vigor to lead the medical personnel of the HSA once I return home.” Locally Dr. Jefferson offers guidance and mentorship to young Caymanians who are aspiring physicians as well as those in allied health fields through their university years and into medical school. Over the years, he has mentored over 25 individuals. Dr Jefferson continues his local and regional humanitarian efforts through various initiatives as a member of Rotary Club of Grand Cayman Sunrise. Dr. Jefferson has been with the HSA since 1998 and took up his current post as Medical Director in 2012. He holds a BSc honours degree in Biochemistry and Physiology from the University of the West Indies (UWI), where he also obtained his primary medical training and postgraduate training. He went on to earn an Advanced Diploma in Anaesthesia followed by Doctorate of Medicine in Anaesthesia and Critical Care. Dr. Jefferson’s education and experience extends well beyond medicine, having obtained a Master’s degree in Public Policy and Management from the University of London in 2001 and then pursued a Doctorate in Business Management from the Swiss Management Institute with an emphasis on medical tourism. In addition to being a practicing physician, Dr. Jefferson has lectured regionally and internationally in such fields as strategic leadership, governance and policy and written for a number of peer-reviewed publications.

A fuel shortage blamed on the Trump Administration has turned filling a tank in Cuba into an ordeal even for a country used to waiting in lines. Around Havana, drivers spend days hunting desperately for gas, calling friends and updating online chat groups with sightings of diesel, regular and higher-octane fuel at gas stations. Lines this week have come to stretch for blocks with waits up to five hours long. Drivers park and shut off their cars to wait in the shade and chat with friends as cars crawl past pumps far in the distance. Increasingly, gas stations are running out with people still waiting in line. Drivers have started lining up outside empty gas stations in the hope that a truck from the state-run fuel monopoly will come by to fill its pumps. Cuban officials blame a U.S. policy of sanctioning ships that bring petroleum products from Venezuela, Cuba's main ally and source of highly subsidized fuel for two decades. Outside observers say the broader cause is Cuba's energy overdependence on a single socialist ally whose oil industry has gone into freefall. Cuba relies on Venezuela for about 60 percent of its daily consumption, according to some estimates. "Once again they committed the great strategic error of putting all their eggs in one basket," said Jorge Piñon, an expert on Cuban and Venezuelan energy and economics at the University of Texas. "They didn't learn the lesson of the '80s when they depended on the Soviet Union without an insurance policy protecting them from political changes." Whatever the cause, the result is an energy shortage that's crippling Cuba's already slack economy and forcing people to spend much of their week worrying about how to get around. "If I don't manage to fill up now all I have is enough to get home and park my car," said Karel Perez, a 44-year-old restaurant employee. Interminable gas lines are only the most visible sign of a fuel crisis that's led to cutbacks in public transport, public services and every sort of state-run business in one of the world's last centrally planned economies. Train and bus service has been cut back, state employees are working half days and farmers are being asked to use oxen to pull plows instead driving tractors. Police have been posted to bus stops and gas stations to control the long lines. Public employees with state-owned cars have been told to pick up hitchhikers, a measure enforced by public inspectors last seen during the infamous economic crash known as the special period following the collapse of the Soviet Union. More broadly, the country has been suffering months of intermittent shortages of basic products like soap, detergent and, for a while, chicken, due to a lack of hard currency to buy imported goods. Problems with public transport became obvious this month, leading to widespread discontent among Cubans. On Sept. 11, President Miguel Díaz-Canel announced that the country had to cut back its use of petroleum products, particularly diesel, due to a shortage of tankers he blamed on U.S. sanctions. Since then, gas lines winding for blocks have become a feature of the landscape in Havana and around the country. The government says the arrival of tankers in October should relieve the situation somewhat, but many Cubans remain worried. "Since public transport has gotten bad I try not to go out and I walk to work," said Jacqueline Pereira, a 35-year-old state employee. "People are tense."


This Feb. 15, 2018 photo shows the Jeep logo at the Pittsburgh Auto Show. U.S. safety regulators are investigating complaints of steering problems in about 270,000 SUVs made by Fiat Chrysler. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

US safety regulators are investigating complaints of steering problems in about 270,000 SUVs made by Fiat Chrysler. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says it granted a consumer's petition asking for a probe into 2018 and 2019 Jeep Wranglers. The agency says more than 3500 owners have complained to the company and government about frame weld problems or steering issues including a shimmy or wobble, looseness, or locking up. No crashes or injuries have been reported. The Wrangler was recalled last year for misaligned welds that could cause steering problems. The government will determine if another recall is needed. Fiat Chrysler says it's cooperating. The company says dealers will install a hydraulic device to mitigate vibration in order to address customer concerns. The fix is free.

Gary Allison, left, waves while standing with other union members picketing outside the General Motors Plant in Arlington, Texas, Monday, Sept. 16, 2019. More than 49,000 members of the United Auto Workers walked off General Motors factory floors or set up picket lines as contract talks with the company deteriorated into a strike. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Talks are set to resume Tuesday after a pause overnight, but there was no end to the strike against General Motors. Brian Rothenberg, spokesman for the UAW, said Tuesday "They are talking, they've made progress, we'll see how long it takes." The walkout by upward of 49,000 United Auto Workers members has brought to a standstill more than 50 factories and parts warehouses in the union's first strike against the No. 1 USautomaker in over a decade. Workers left factories and formed picket lines shortly after midnight Monday in the dispute over a new four-year contract. The union's top negotiator said in a letter to the company that the strike could have been averted had the company made its latest offer sooner. The letter dated Sunday suggests that the company and union are not as far apart as the rhetoric leading up to the strike had indicated. Negotiations continued Monday in Detroit after breaking off during the weekend. But Rothenberg said the two sides have come to terms on only two percent of the contract. "We've got 98 percentto go," he said Monday. GM on Monday cancelled the workers' company-sponsored health insurance, Rothenberg said, but the UAW had policies in place and is covering striking workers. GM said that under the UAW contract, responsibility for health insurance shifts from the company to the union if there is a strike. "We understand strikes are difficult and disruptive to families," said Daniel Flores, GM spokesman. "While on strike, some benefits shift to being funded by the union's strike fund, and in this case hourly employees are eligible for union-paid COBRA so their health care benefits can continue." Asked about the possibility of federal mediation, President Donald Trump, said it's possible if the company and union want it. "Hopefully they'll be able to work out the GM strike quickly," Trump said Monday before leaving the White House for New Mexico. "Hopefully, they're going to work it out quickly and solidly." Wall Street did not like seeing the union picketers. GM shares closed Monday down more than four percent, and edged down 15 cents to $37.06 Tuesday morning. On the picket line Monday at GM's transmission plant in Toledo, Ohio, workers who said they have been with the company for more than 30 years were concerned for younger colleagues who are making less money under GM's two-tier wage scale and have fewer benefits. Paul Kane, from South Lyon, Michigan, a 42-year GM employee, said much of what the union is fighting for will not affect him. "It's not right when you're working next to someone, doing the same job and they're making a lot more money," he said. "They should be making the same as me. They've got families to support." Kane said GM workers gave up pay raises and made other concessions to keep GM afloat during its 2009 trip through bankruptcy protection. "Now it's their turn to pay us back," he said. "That was the promise they gave." UAW Vice President Terry Dittes told GM that the company's latest offer might have made it possible to reach an agreement if it had come earlier. "We are disappointed that the company waited until just two hours before the contract expired to make what we regard as its first serious offer," Dittes wrote in the letter to Scott Sandefur, GM's vice president of labour relations. There are many important items left in the talks, including wage increases, pay for new hires, job security, profit sharing and treatment of temporary workers, Dittes wrote. "We are willing to meet as frequently, and for as long as it takes, to reach an agreement that treats our members fairly," the letter said. GM issued a statement saying it wants to reach a deal that builds a strong future for workers and the business. The automaker said Sunday that it offered pay raises and $7 billion worth of USfactory investments resulting in 5400 new positions, a minority of which would be filled by existing employees. GM would not give a precise number. The company also said it offered higher profit sharing, "nationally leading" health benefits and an $8000 payment to each worker upon ratification. Before the talks broke off, GM offered new products to replace work at two of four USfactories that it intends to close. The company pledged to build a new all-electric pickup truck at a factory in Detroit, according to a person who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. The person was not authorised to disclose details of the negotiations. The automaker also offered to open an electric vehicle battery plant in Lordstown, Ohio, where it has a huge factory that has already stopped making cars and will be closed. The new factory would be in addition to a proposal to make electric vehicles for a company called Workhorse, the person said. It's unclear how many workers the two plants would employ. The closures, especially of the Ohio plant, have become issues in the 2020 presidential campaign. President Donald Trump has consistently criticised the company and demanded that Lordstown be reopened. Kristin Dziczek, vice president of labour and industry for the Center for Automotive Research, an industry think tank, said the letter and resumption of contract talks are encouraging signs. "It makes me think that both sides are probably closer than it might have seemed before," she said. But both Dziczek and Art Wheaton, an auto industry expert at the Worker Institute at Cornell University, say GM left out key details when it made part of its offer public, and working out those details could make the strike last longer. "I think GM kind of sabotaged some of the negotiations by going immediately to the public," Wheaton said. "It really distorts the offer." The strike shut down 33 manufacturing plants in nine states across the US, as well as 22 parts-distribution warehouses. It's the first national strike by the union since a two-day walkout in 2007 that had little impact on the company. Workers at Fiat Chrysler and Ford continued working under contract extensions. Any agreement reached with GM will serve as a template for talks with the other two companies.


Dr. Delroy Jefferson, Medical Director of the Cayman Islands Health Services Authority (HSA), has been named a Distinguished Humanitarian by the Global Listening Centre. The Global Listening Centre (GLC) is an international non-profit organisation that defines listening as effective intercultural and interpersonal relations by being attentive and respectful of all persons. As a member of the GLC, Dr. Jefferson has been recognized for his contributions in both his personal and professional environments. Dr Jefferson is just one of three individuals globally to receive this 2019 Distinguished Humanitarian Award. For the past fifteen years, Dr. Jefferson has dedicated his annual leave to humanitarian efforts in countries such as Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica and Egypt. On these self-funded trips, he provides medical aid to persons with socioeconomic challenges free of charge. In keeping with his mandate to be an effective global listener, he engages in cultural exchange with these persons, offering insight to his culture while absorbing theirs in return. In his role as a physician, providing free care to less fortunate persons has been a longstanding passion of Dr. Jefferson. In addition to providing healthcare assistance, Dr. Jefferson has also funded academic scholarships for students in Africa and the Caribbean. “I look forward to my annual humanitarian missions as a time of renewal”, says Dr. Jefferson. “Interacting with those with lesser voices and empowering through education, financial aid or healthcare gives me extraordinary fulfilment. Knowing that I have aided those persons gives me the vigor to lead the medical personnel of the HSA once I return home.” Locally Dr. Jefferson offers guidance and mentorship to young Caymanians who are aspiring physicians as well as those in allied health fields through their university years and into medical school. Over the years, he has mentored over 25 individuals. Dr Jefferson continues his local and regional humanitarian efforts through various initiatives as a member of Rotary Club of Grand Cayman Sunrise. Dr. Jefferson has been with the HSA since 1998 and took up his current post as Medical Director in 2012. He holds a BSc honours degree in Biochemistry and Physiology from the University of the West Indies (UWI), where he also obtained his primary medical training and postgraduate training. He went on to earn an Advanced Diploma in Anaesthesia followed by Doctorate of Medicine in Anaesthesia and Critical Care. Dr. Jefferson’s education and experience extends well beyond medicine, having obtained a Master’s degree in Public Policy and Management from the University of London in 2001 and then pursued a Doctorate in Business Management from the Swiss Management Institute with an emphasis on medical tourism. In addition to being a practicing physician, Dr. Jefferson has lectured regionally and internationally in such fields as strategic leadership, governance and policy and written for a number of peer-reviewed publications.

Charity dog rescue group, One Dog at a Time, have a wide variety of activities planned in the run up to the end of the year! Why not support them and have fun at the same time? All funds raised help rescue dogs and puppies on death row at the Pound, assist with rehoming surrendered pooches and ensure that dogs without homes find a loving forever home! All One Dog rescues are placed into foster homes and monies raised pay for vet treatment, food, treats, toys and other necessary equipment. So far this year, despite the new restrictions on exporting rescue dogs to America, the group has still managed to rehome over 100 dogs and pups and there are still more in foster homes looking for their forever family! If you would like to foster, or are looking for the perfect pooch, please contact the team who will send photos of the dogs available and arrange a meet and greet in the first instance! Allura Boat trip 22nd September, A final reminder to Join One Dog At A Time and Allura (Nautilus) on a fun-filled adventure at Stingray Sandbar and Starfish Point to help rescue and rehome dogs from DOA pound. $40 includes catamaran boat trip plus nibbles. Drinks available. LIMITED PLACES TICKETS IN ADVANCE TO ENSURE YOU CAN BOARD! Family groups are welcome and children will be charged according to age. Call 9178284 or 9267506 or email onedogatatimeky@gmail.com Sunday 22nd September @ The Yacht Club, Dock C, 1pm departure If weather is an issue the trip will be postponed. Locked Inn 26th September, from 6pm. Are brain teasers for you? Why not come along to the One Dog at a Time event for a social gathering and test your skills against the Locked Inn rooms? Teams, or individuals to create a team on the night, are welcome to attend. $300 entry per team of 6 or $50 for individuals. The price includes the Locked Inn Experience, food and a complimentary drink for each team member. Additional refreshments will be available. Tickets available now so call and book! 9178284 or 9267506 or email onedogatatimeky@gmail.com Plant sale 29th September at Mercury Crescent, South Sound Road. Looking for some amazing plants to add to your garden, patio or window box? Why not pop along to Heather’s house and choose from a fabulous array of plants and fruits at incredible prices? Refreshments will be available to purchase, so let’s throw those snags on a Barbie and get spending! All proceeds from the sale will be donated to One Dog at a Time. Plants available for purchase from 09:00-12:00 Please park considerately. Any keen gardeners who would like to contribute plants for the sale beforehand, please Whatsapp CJ on 939 3995 to arrange collection Birthday Party for Hunter! Salty’s, Grand Harbor, 29th September With a theme of ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas!’ All dogs are welcome to celebrate Hunter’s birthday! Event starts at 17:00. Raffle and 50/50 draw, plus ‘free the dog’ party game. Refreshments will be available to purchase in Salty’s and a special birthday cake will be provided for all the dogs! Donations to assist the charity are gladly welcomed, particularly dog food or monetary donations to pay for the vaccinations and spays/neuters. Come along and have some fun!